Amid budget and enrollment challenges, Indianapolis Public Schools officials have a five-point plan for major changes.
Providers hope the stress of maintaining safety protocols to keep the virus at bay will ease.
Indianapolis has committed COVID aid to retaining staff, academic supports, and infrastructure.
Ivy Tech, which serves about 74,000 students across the state, has made steady gains in completion rates.
Preschool enrollment in the district rose this year, but other factors will influence its long-term fate
Conservative pushback against critical race theory threatens to upend the work of Indianapolis schools to close academic gaps for students of color.
College-going rates among high schoolers continue to fall — and not just because of the pandemic, the Indiana Commission for Higher Education said.
Monarca Academy staff looks to enroll one to two classes of 6th graders by the end of the summer.
Indianapolis Public Schools offered retention bonuses in late March to 3,200 eligible staff members, but they came with an attendance requirement that staff couldn’t take more than two sick days for the remainder of the semester.
Manual is no longer just a high school. Day Early Learning has converted administrative offices and an auditorium into child care rooms to serve Indy’s south side.
More than 400 high school students graduated Tuesday from IPS’ Arsenal Tech.
The Republican-dominated Indiana state legislature voted to overturn Gov. Eric Holcomb’s veto of House Enrolled Act 1041, which bans transgender girls from girl’s youth sports.
Whether a student can play a sport, study advanced math, or sing in a choir varies widely by where they attend school, Indianapolis Public School officials said at the latest in a series of meetings that raise the possibility of closing some schools.
As Indiana limits virtual learning, some districts will adjust how they handle school on snow days and on teacher training days.
Twin Lakes High School teacher Kim Rosenbaum started a “women in welding” class for female teachers, counselors, and administrators.
Education advocates say the proposed middle school civics standards need more specificity, especially in regards to the history of Black Americans and other people of color.
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Indiana voters approved seven local property tax increases to send more money to schools, but voted down increases for school construction..
A political newcomer, Andrea Hunley defeated four other Democrats and now goes on to face Republican Evan Shearin in the November general election.
Besides leading Center for Inquiry School 2, IPS principal Andrea Hunley is running for State Senate district 46 in the May 3 primary.
I’m an education major. Here’s what draws me to a profession many are leaving.
As IPS seeks relief from the $1 charter law, it could let Purdue Polytechnic North temporarily use Broad Ripple High School under an innovation school agreement.
A group of Indiana education leaders is calling for the state to act urgently to address academic disparities for Black students.
School officials hope that Indiana’s low unemployment rate and growing home values will convince voters to pass property tax increases in the May election.
For the first time, employment rates and median wages after high school will start to factor into how Indiana gauges school performance. But the data isn’t complete.
Dubbed enrichment scholarships, Indiana’s voucher-like program will provide each student who qualifies through their score on state tests a $500 grant toward tutoring.
IPS wants to bolster hiring and retention as schools enter their third year of grappling with COVID.
The Indiana Department of Education offered schools the option this year to test second graders on the IREAD-3 in order to identify and help struggling readers earlier.
Indianapolis Public Schools has too few students for the number of buildings in the district. A dozen of those facilities in use are in poor or worse condition, district leaders say.
Indiana schools no longer have to mask, distance or quarantine, something the youngest students and new teachers have never experienced before.
The Indiana legislature didn’t pass restrictions on race and racism or stocking certain material in school libraries, but the bills that did pass are still likely to affect teaching and learning.
A wide-ranging bill to restrict what teachers could say about race and racism died in Indiana despite anticipation that the state would pass it.
Indiana has earmarked millions of federal dollars to train more special education teachers as a shortage looms.
Some Indiana lawmakers signaled their interest in adding back parts of the controversial bill to other pieces of legislation in the final weeks of the session.
The Indiana Senate has killed a bill that sought to restrict how teachers taught race and racism. Senators missed a deadline to move the bill forward.
What went wrong? Advocates question why Kindezi decided to shut down on short notice, and whether IPS should have done more to avoid the school closure.
District officials cite new guidance from the Indiana Department of Health and falling numbers of COVID cases in their decision.
Rep. Bob Behning, who is the chair of Indiana’s House Education Committee, tried to clarify his remarks Thursday after they drew criticism on Twitter.
House Bill 1134 restricts teaching three ideas that Indiana lawmakers describe as “divisive,” a limit that has drawn overwhelming public criticism.
Instead of finding a new charter operator or running the school itself, IPS will recommend closing Joyce Kilmer School 69 on the eastside.
The Republican supermajority in the Indiana legislature has watered down some of the most controversial parts of its divisive concepts bill.
New Indiana Department of Health guidance will no longer require schools to quarantine students who have been exposed to COVID-19 beginning Feb. 23.
Dozens of speakers told Indiana senators Wednesday that no changes could fix House Bill 1134, which bans three “divisive concepts” from the classroom.
Indiana’s House Bill 1134 could be amended to list 3 ‘divisive concepts’ that teachers could not teach and to make curriculum review committees optional for schools.
Indianapolis Public Schools is receiving free rapid tests through a federal program and bought additional tests with federal relief money.
Submitting all of our teaching materials ahead of time is impractical for Indiana educators already stretched thin.
Colleges should embrace ‘a dramatically different system of learning.’