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Weekend Reading: Washington gears up for NCLB revamp

Once Anita's father saw her win the state competition as a freshman, he began to give her feedback about whether her performances sounded realistic at the dinner table.
Once Anita's father saw her win the state competition as a freshman, he began to give her feedback about whether her performances sounded realistic at the dinner table.
Oliver Morrison
  • The nation’s top education chief is expected to lay out his own priorities for revamping the nation’s laws next week. (Politco)
  • The Republicans’ plan to rewrite sweeping education legislation could lessen the federal role in classrooms. (Politico Magazine)
  • That could be a bad thing for students who aren’t white, don’t speak English, are poor, or learning with special needs. (The Daily Beast)
  • The debate over No Child Left Behind isn’t the only issue. Here are another six education issues to watch in 2015. (EduWonk)
  • An author argues in her new book that parents can — and must — transform their families’ relationships to high-stakes tests. (Salon)
  • The millennials who are reshaping the classroom are fighting for the three Cs: code, college readiness and community impact. (Forbes)
  • Interest in understanding students’ non-cognitive skills has surged. But there’s little agreement on how to do so. (GenerationNext)
  • An open — and rather lengthy — letter to Joel Klein from a New York City math teacher. (Gary Rubinstein’s Blog)
  • The mayor of Providence, R.I., hopes a small initiatives Providence Talks will close the word gap between poor and middle class students. (New Yorker)
  • Here’s the impetus for President Obama’s free community college program. (The Upshot)
  • The most radical part of Obama’s free community college proposal isn’t that it’s free — it’s that it’s universal. (Vox)
  • Some community colleges could see enrollment rates — especially among black students — increase by up to four percentage points. (Storyline)
  • A new study found the surprising result that for black students, the SAT is a far more important predictor of college GPA than for white or Latino students. (Storyline)

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