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Hear from the IPS board candidates running in the 2020 election

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Join Chalkbeat Indiana and WFYI for a virtual forum with the IPS board candidates.

Lauren Bryant/Chalkbeat

The coronavirus pandemic has thrown a new spotlight and new pressures on the leadership of Indianapolis Public Schools as the district navigates the challenges of educating students and keeping them safe.

Ten candidates, including three incumbents, are running for four seats on the IPS board this fall. Join Chalkbeat Indiana and WFYI on Tuesday, Sept. 29, for a virtual forum to hear from the candidates on issues facing the district, including the school system’s response to COVID-19, school funding, impending budget reductions, racial equity, and innovation schools.

IPS returns to in-person learning next month, one of the last districts in the city to do so. The pandemic created extra costs for the district, which was already planning to make hefty budget cuts that could lead to closing schools. The district, made up of about 80% students of color, has resolved to scrutinize and work toward undoing racist systems and attitudes.

IPS has also transformed over recent years, converting many of its struggling schools into “innovation schools” independently run by charter operators or nonprofit partners.

Register for the virtual event and submit your questions for the candidates here.

Correction: Sept. 22, 2020: A previous version of this story said that 11 candidates were running for the school board. One candidate, Cary Patterson, has been removed from the election board list. Patterson told Chalkbeat she made a clerical error in her filing.

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