Pulse of the public

Union poll finds negative public attitudes on testing

Coloradans are concerned about the amount of testing in the state’s schools, according to a poll commissioned by the Colorado Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union.

“The survey confirms the actual experience parents and teachers are having all over Colorado – there is simply too much testing and not enough funding,” said CEA President Kerrie Dallman. The CEA supports trimming back the state’s testing system.

Here are some key results from the poll:

  • Level of testing: Less testing was supported by 63 percent, same amount 28 percent, more 5 percent.
  • Primary purpose of testing: Assessing student progress was listed by58 percent, assessing of district and school performance 24 percent, assessing teacher effectiveness 13 percent.
  • Effectiveness of testing in measuring student progress: Somewhat effective 52 percent, not effective 34 percent, strongly effective 11 percent.
  • Appropriate amount of class time on testing: 0-10 percent – 45 percent of respondents, 10-20 percent – 38 percent, 20-30 percent – 12 percent, more than 30 percent – 2 percent.
  • Parental opt out: Under special circumstances 43 percent support this, never 28 percent, support for any reason 25 percent.

Asked how familiar they were with the standardized tests in their school districts, 34 percent of respondents said they were very familiar, 45 percent somewhat familiar and 21 not very familiar.

On the question of how many standardized tests their children take each year, 50 percent of parent respondents said two to five and 10 percent said six to 10. Asked if they felt their children were adequately supported by technology in their schools, 71 percent said yes and 20 percent said no.

Other issues

The CEA’s poll also asked respondents to choose the “top problem” facing education and about their opinions on the Common Core State Standards.

Some 29 percent identified school funding as the single most important problem facing public schools, with standardized testing and parental involvement tied at 13 percent for the next most-cited problem. Teachers unions and administrators each were mentioned as the top problem by 12 percent each.

On Common Core, 32 percent of respondents supported the language arts and math standards, 34 percent opposed them and 34 percent weren’t sure of their opinions. The survey also asked respondents if they were aware of the state’s Colorado-only standards in other subjects – 59 percent didn’t know about them.

The poll surveyed 706 adults, including 600 registered voters and 219 parents of school-aged children. Interviews were done Sept. 12-16, primarily by telephone. The poll was done by SurveyUSA. See questions, demographic tabulations and full results here.

Testing task force chips away at issues

Monday also was the fourth meeting of the Standards and Assessments Task Force, a 15-member appointed group that is studying state and local testing systems and that is supposed to make recommendations to the 2015 legislative session.

Up to now the group has been heavily involved in information-gathering and organizational issues, and it has only three more meetings scheduled before it’s supposed to complete its report.

The task force represents a broad spectrum of education interests, from cut-it-back parent representatives to education reform group leaders who want to preserve key elements of the current system. Some of those divisions started to surface during discussion at the group’s September meeting (see story).

One exercise the task force did on Monday was to start narrowing down issues it wants to research and discuss further. Those issues include:

  • Shortening the time taken by tests
  • Cutting back state testing to the minimums required by the federal government
  • Aligning and combining local, state and federally required tests
  • Excusing students who are performing at top levels from testing
  • Allowing districts to continue giving paper-and-pencil tests
  • Letting districts choose from a state-approved menu of tests
  • Delaying the use of results from new tests for accountability and educator evaluationuntil those tests have been fully validated
  • Changing the timing of the new science and social studies tests to reduce the crush of testing every spring

The group also was briefed on a recent memo from the U.S. Department of Education that detailed the fairly limited options that state has in changing the testing system. (See this story for background.) But that report prompted little significant discussion.

On Monday evening four members of the task force held the first in series of public meetings on testing. About two-dozen people showed up at Denver’s North High School, some raising familiar concerns about testing distracting from classroom instruction, the costs of testing and infringements on state and district autonomy.

The task force plans a series of such meetings around the state – see the schedule here.

ASD scores

In Tennessee’s turnaround district, 9 in 10 young students fall short on their first TNReady exams

PHOTO: Scott Elliott

Nine out of 10 of elementary- and middle-school students in Tennessee’s turnaround district aren’t scoring on grade level in English and math, according to test score data released Thursday.

The news is unsurprising: The Achievement School District oversees 32 of the state’s lowest-performing schools. But it offers yet another piece of evidence that the turnaround initiative has fallen far short of its ambitious original goal of vaulting struggling schools to success.

Around 5,300 students in grades 3-8 in ASD schools took the new, harder state exam, TNReady, last spring. Here’s how many scored “below” or “approaching,” meaning they did not meet the state’s standards:

  • 91.8 percent of students in English language arts;
  • 91.5 percent in math;
  • 77.9 percent in science.

View scores for all ASD schools in our spreadsheet

In all cases, ASD schools’ scores fell short of state averages, which were all lower than in the past because of the new exam’s higher standards. About 66 percent of students statewide weren’t on grade level in English language arts, 62 percent weren’t on grade level in math, and 41 percent fell short in science.

ASD schools also performed slightly worse, on average, than the 15 elementary and middle schools in Shelby County Schools’ Innovation Zone, the district’s own initiative for low-performing schools. On average, about 89 percent of iZone students in 3-8 weren’t on grade level in English; 84 percent fell short of the state’s standards in math.

The last time that elementary and middle schools across the state received test scores, in 2015, ASD schools posted scores showing faster-than-average improvement. (Last year’s tests for grades 3-8 were canceled because of technical problems.)

The low scores released today suggest that the ASD’s successes with TCAP, the 2015 exam, did not carry over to the higher standards of TNReady.

But Verna Ruffin, the district’s new chief of academics, said the scores set a new bar for future growth and warned against comparing them to previous results.

“TNReady has more challenging questions and is based on a different, more rigorous set of expectations developed by Tennessee educators,” Ruffin said in a statement. “For the Achievement School District, this means that we will use this new baseline data to inform instructional practices and strategically meet the needs of our students and staff as we acknowledge the areas of strength and those areas for improvement.”

Some ASD schools broke the mold and posted some strong results. Humes Preparatory Middle School, for example, had nearly half of students meet or exceed the state’s standards in science, although only 7 percent of students in math and 12 percent in reading were on grade level.

Thursday’s score release also included individual high school level scores. View scores for individual schools throughout the state as part of our spreadsheet here.

Are Children Learning

School-by-school TNReady scores for 2017 are out now. See how your school performed

PHOTO: Zondra Williams/Shelby County Schools
Students at Wells Station Elementary School in Memphis hold a pep rally before the launch of state tests, which took place between April 17 and May 5 across Tennessee.

Nearly six months after Tennessee students sat down for their end-of-year exams, all of the scores are now out. State officials released the final installment Thursday, offering up detailed information about scores for each school in the state.

Only about a third of students met the state’s English standards, and performance in math was not much better, according to scores released in August.

The new data illuminates how each school fared in the ongoing shift to higher standards. Statewide, scores for students in grades 3-8, the first since last year’s TNReady exam was canceled amid technical difficulties, were lower than in the past. Scores also remained low in the second year of high school tests.

“These results show us both where we can learn from schools that are excelling and where we have specific schools or student groups that need better support to help them achieve success – so they graduate from high school with the ability to choose their path in life,” Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said in a statement.

Did some schools prepare teachers and students better for the new state standards, which are similar to the Common Core? Was Memphis’s score drop distributed evenly across the city’s schools? We’ll be looking at the data today to try to answer those questions.

Check out all of the scores in our spreadsheet or on the state website and add your questions and insights in the comments.