Teacher Town

What a teacher survey in Memphis’ ‘priority schools’ reveals about the obstacles facing ‘Teacher Town’

PHOTO: Oliver Morrison
New teachers undergo training in 2014 through the Memphis Teacher Residency.

The question of where Memphis should find the hundreds of new teachers it needs every year has long fueled debate over efforts to improve the city’s lowest-performing schools.

Some — including Memphis’ current education leaders — have argued that the city needs to look far and wide for students in struggling schools to have a shot at having the teachers they need. Others have argued that local schools are best served by teachers who understand what it’s like to live and learn in Memphis.

That debate got new information Tuesday with the release of Teach901’s annual survey of educators working in “priority schools,” or those where test scores put them in the bottom 5 percent statewide in 2013.

Teach901, which has gone from building buzz about Memphis to recruiting teachers on its own, surveyed nearly 1,200 teachers at 40 priority schools that have undergone changes aimed at dramatically boosting test scores. Here’s what the survey found:

1. New teachers are moving to “Teacher Town,” but most aren’t traveling far. When leaders of Shelby County Schools and the state-run Achievement School District, which includes only low-performing schools undergoing overhauls, pledged two years ago to turn Memphis into “Teacher Town,” they said the city would need to recruit teachers from afar as well as developing them closer to home.

That appears to be happening: About 150 teachers who responded to the survey said they had moved to Memphis in the last year, with the greatest numbers coming from elsewhere in Tennessee and from nearby states, including 34 from Mississippi. An outlier was California, which sent 14 new teachers to Memphis this year, according to the survey.

2. Priority schools are increasingly recruiting and hiring teachers who look like their students. Two thirds of the teachers who responded were black, up slightly since last year and substantially since the survey’s first year, when teachers at only 12 schools participated. The shift reflects a growing understanding that students and teachers both benefit when they have a shared background, according to Emily Cupples, Teach901’s coordinator.

When efforts to overhaul low-performing schools began in Memphis, “we didn’t realize as a city how intentional we should be in thinking through how teachers should be able to empathize and identify with the student,” Cupples said. Now, she said schools and charter operators are thinking about race when recruiting teachers.

3. Memphis’ teacher recruitment challenge isn’t abating any time soon. A third of teachers in priority schools say they plan to stop teaching within five years. That pace of attrition is common among schools serving high-needs students — nationally, estimates of how many teachers leave within five years range from less than 20 percent to as high as 50 percent — and suggests that Memphis’ efforts to improve struggling schools are unlikely to escape forces that have kept improvements from being sustained elsewhere.

What’s more, the report concludes, the city isn’t yet in a position to head off mass teacher departures. “Without actual attrition data … it is difficult to know the severity of this potential threat,” it says before recommending that local groups work with schools to track what happens to teachers who leave.

4. Where to find the teachers Memphis needs isn’t clear. Three quarters of new recruits answered that “the opportunity to be part of an education reform movement that is garnering national attention” was important or very important in their decision to move to the city — but they were also more likely to say that they planned to move away and to leave the teaching profession. In contrast, nearly 80 percent of teachers who graduated from the University of Memphis, the largest supplier of teachers to schools in the city, said they planned to stay in the classroom for more than five years, but they gave their preparation a below-average rating.

Teach901’s conclusions reflect an ambivalence about whether to recruit new teacher talent from afar or look closer to home. The report recommends that the city “evaluate the return on investment of attracting outside teacher talent to Memphis,” while also suggesting that it “continue to invest time and resources to brand Memphis as the place to be for those who want to be a part of the ‘mission’ of urban school reform.” Memphis Teacher Residency, an intensive training program that has increasingly worked to sell recruits on the city as well as prepare them for the classroom, best splits the difference, according to the report.

on the run

‘Sex and the City’ star and public schools advocate Cynthia Nixon launches bid for N.Y. governor

Cynthia Nixon on Monday announced her long-anticipated run for New York governor.

Actress and public schools advocate Cynthia Nixon announced Monday that she’s running for governor of New York, ending months of speculation and launching a campaign that will likely spotlight education.

Nixon, who starred as Miranda in the TV series “Sex and the City,” will face New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo in September’s Democratic primary.

Nixon has been active in New York education circles for more than a decade. She served as a  longtime spokeswoman for the Alliance for Quality Education, a union-backed advocacy organization. Though Nixon will step down from that role, according to a campaign spokeswoman, education promises to be a centerpiece of her campaign.

In a campaign kickoff video posted to Twitter, Nixon calls herself “a proud public school graduate, and a prouder public school parent.” Nixon has three children.

“I was given chances I just don’t see for most of New York’s kids today,” she says.

Nixon’s advocacy began when her oldest child started school, which was around the same time the recession wreaked havoc on education budgets. She has slammed Gov. Cuomo for his spending on education during his two terms in office, and she has campaigned for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

In 2008, she stepped into an emotional fight on the Upper West Side over a plan to deal with overcrowding and segregation that would have impacted her daughter’s school. In a video of brief remarks during a public meeting where the plan was discussed, Nixon is shouted down as she claims the proposal would lead to a “de facto segregated” school building.

Nixon faces steep competition in her first run for office. She is up against an incumbent governor who has amassed a $30 million war chest, according to the New York Times. If elected, she would be the first woman and the first openly gay governor in the state.

cooling off

New York City charter leader Eva Moskowitz says Betsy DeVos is not ‘ready for prime time’

PHOTO: Chalkbeat
Success Academy CEO and founder Eva Moskowitz seemed to be cooling her support for U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

In New York City, Eva Moskowitz has been a lone voice of support for the controversial U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. But even Moskowitz appears to be cooling on the secretary following an embarrassing interview.

“I believe her heart is in the right place,” Moskowitz, founder and CEO of Success Academy, said of DeVos at an unrelated press conference. “But as the recent interviews indicate, I don’t believe she’s ready for primetime in terms of answering all of the complex questions that need to be answered on the topic of public education and choice.”

That is an apparent reference to DeVos’s roundly criticized appearance on 60 Minutes, which recently aired a 30-minute segment in which the secretary admits she hasn’t visited struggling schools in her tenure. Even advocates of school choice, DeVos’s signature issue, called her performance an “embarrassment,” and “Saturday Night Live” poked fun at her.  

Moskowitz’s comments are an about-face from when the education secretary was first appointed. While the rest of the New York City charter school community was mostly quiet after DeVos was tapped for the position, Moskowitz was the exception, tweeting that she was “thrilled.” She doubled-down on her support months later in an interview with Chalkbeat.

“I believe that education reform has to be a bipartisan issue,” she said.

During Monday’s press conference, which Success Academy officials called to push the city for more space for its growing network, Moskowitz also denied rumors, fueled by a tweet from AFT President Randi Weingarten, that Success officials had recently met with members of the Trump administration.

Shortly after the election, Moskowitz met with Trump amid speculation she was being considered for the education secretary position. This time around, she said it was “untrue” that any visits had taken place.

“You all know that a while back, I was asked to meet with the president-elect. I thought it was important to take his call,” she said. “I was troubled at the time by the Trump administration. I’m even more troubled now. And so, there has been no such meeting.”