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Where 4 new IPS board members stand on racial equity, school closures, budget cuts

The two incumbents and two newcomers to the board have nuanced views on the pressing challenges the district will face under their leadership.

A “Prep College Careers” sign on a window at Crispus Attucks High School, a public school in Indianapolis, Indiana. — April 2019 — Photo by Alan Petersime/Chalkbeat

During the election, Chalkbeat Indiana and WFYI asked candidates to respond to the biggest issues facing the district and how they would represent their constituents.

Alan Petersime for Chalkbeat

After a vigorous campaign, four candidates backed by charter school friendly political action committees won seats on the Indianapolis Public Schools board: Kenneth Allen, Will Pritchard, Venita Moore, and Diane Arnold. 

The two incumbents and two newcomers to the board have nuanced views on the pressing challenges the district will face under their leadership, including how to live up to its commitment to racial equity, tackle looming budget cuts, and address the educational impact of the pandemic. 

During the election, Chalkbeat Indiana and WFYI asked candidates to respond to the biggest issues facing the district and how they would represent their constituents. Candidates showed support for the district’s recent Racial Equity Mindset, Commitment & Action policy and concern for keeping students academically on track during the pandemic. Below are answers from the four candidates who won seats.

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