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Enrollment rises slightly at Indiana schools

Scenes from Ben Davis High School in Indianapolis, Ind. on Friday, April 9, 2021. This was the first week back full-time since the beginning of the pandemic for Wayne Township Schools.

Scenes from Ben Davis High School in Indianapolis, Ind. on Friday, April 9, 2021. This was the first week back since the beginning of the pandemic for Indianapolis Public Schools.

Aaricka Washington / Chalkbeat

Enrollment at Indiana schools rose slightly this school year, according to data released Thursday by the Department of Education, driven in part by the state’s youngest students. 

Just over 1.12 million students are enrolled in Indiana public and private schools, an increase of around 0.67%  — or 7,000 students — from last school year, when enrollment declined 1.5% related to the pandemic. 

The total remains slightly below pre-pandemic enrollment of 1.13 million students.

Enrollment gains this year are driven by a 5.25% increase in kindergarten, according to a statement from the department. 

Including all grade levels, public schools grew 0.2%, while private schools increased 5.9%. 

About 83,000 students are enrolled in private schools in the state, while just over 1 million attend public schools.

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