Higher Education

In 2022, Chalkbeat Indiana is expanding its coverage of higher education. Our reporting will continue to focus on educational equity, examining how Indiana’s higher education systems serve students of color and students from low-income backgrounds. Do you have a story to share? Reach out to Stephanie Wang at swang@chalkbeat.org.

Some officials want to make it easier for students to get financial aid and other support so they can head straight from high school to college.
Indiana juniors took the SAT as part of graduation requirements for the first time in 2022.
The new Urban College Acceleration Network aims to help schools offer more college level courses to high school students in cities.
Students from Crispus Attucks high school in Indianapolis observe medical professionals at nearby hospitals to start health care careers early.
Indiana spends $3 million a year helping Hoosiers without degrees quickly earn certificates in high-wage fields.
Ivy Tech, which serves about 74,000 students across the state, has made steady gains in completion rates.
College-going rates among high schoolers continue to fall — and not just because of the pandemic, the Indiana Commission for Higher Education said.
For the first time, employment rates and median wages after high school will start to factor into how Indiana gauges school performance. But the data isn’t complete.
Colleges should embrace ‘a dramatically different system of learning.’
House Bill 1190 received support from public speakers and other lawmakers, though some questioned why it was needed if federal law protected free speech on college campuses.
For the third year in a row, the Indiana legislature is considering a bill that would require students to fill out the federal financial aid application.
This year, Chalkbeat Indiana is expanding its coverage of higher education in partnership with Open Campus — and we need your help.
Indy Achieves gives “completion grants” to local college students at Ivy Tech’s Indianapolis campus and IUPUI so they can re-enroll in higher education.
Education disparities among Black students lead to low-wage jobs, according to a new report by an Indianapolis business and community coalition.
Juggling high school, college, and a job was a monumental challenge — but one that saved me time and many thousands of dollars.
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